Linotype

Linotype fans and mid-20th century-printing nerds should enjoy this video featuring the country’s last Linotype newspaper operation in Saguache, Colorado.

Continue reading

Invisible Ink

I’ll confess as a kid I loved espionage: clandestine conversations, dark alley meetings, secret passageways. If it involved a high-level adventure… with a low-level of forgery… with maybe a secret handshake, I was in; and truth be told I still might be.  Growing up pre-mobile phones and computers, note passing

Continue reading

Ink In Their Blood: Print Apprentices Make Good

“James Franklin, printer, in Queen’s Street, wants a likely lad for an apprentice.”[1] The life of a printer’s apprentice or “devil” was no picnic. It usually involved long hours of arduous labor for little or no pay with only small hope of advancement. Apprenticeship – until at least the middle

Continue reading

Book news

As Scotland heads to the polls this week to vote on independence from the United Kingdom, an antiquarian bookseller has drawn attention to the 18th century debate regarding the union of Scotland and England: expressed here in a book of poetry in support of the union.  Equally of interest is

Continue reading

This book bound in human skin…

This book bound in human skin…isn’t human skin after all. Our fascination with the macabre practice of anthropodermic bibliopegy, or human skin bookbinding, isn’t a new one.  This inscription led readers astray for many years before scientific testing of the leather proved the note to be false.

Continue reading

Miniature Sherlock Holmes

For your Friday enjoyment: miniature books, Sherlock Holmes and a Queen’s Doll House.

Continue reading

Bookbinder of the Month | Rose Adler

This week’s post is a bit last minute, though an important subject nonetheless!  Rather than try to write my own biography of Rose Adler, an extremely talented and inspiring Art Deco Bookbinder, I have posted below a detailed and well-written biography from the Willy Huybrechts archive.  You can read the

Continue reading

Patron Saints of Bookbinding

Bookbinding is not for the timid of hand or heart. courtesy of Dan Goldberg Risk of stab by needle, loss of fingers by guillotine: these are the few perils that bookbinders face every day in their field of work. There is even one recorded case of death by beating books. courtesy of

Continue reading

The American Bookbinders Museum: A Brief History of the Museum, Library, and Archive

Founder Tim James has been collecting bookbinding material for twenty years, but the initial hunt wasn’t always for a museum. He began the collection with the thought that upon retiring he could move up to the Gold Country, open a 19th century bookbindery, and become the town curmudgeon. Fortunately for

Continue reading